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Personal Advocacy

You are an advocate. Whether it’s talking to your doctor or educating your child’s school about bleeding disorders, advocacy can and does take place outside of state capitals and in your everyday life. Here are some tools and resources to help guide your advocacy in various “real life” situations:
Personal Advocacy

  • At School
  • At Work
  • For Insurance Coverage
  • In the Emergency Room

School

Starting school is a milestone for any child, especially a child with a bleeding disorder.  There are many concerns around your child’s safety and ability to treat a bleed should one occur while in school.  It is important to be prepared to discuss your child’s situation with his/her school immediately.  As a parent you have the right to be involved in the decision making process that affects your child’s education, which includes developing a process to address your child’s bleeding disorder.

Resources

HFA has developed a “Back to School Toolkit:”  Click here or on the image for tools intended to help you educate the educators and relieve some stress and worry.

back_to_school widget

Work

Improvements in the treatment of bleeding disorders have allowed the community the ability to remain in the workforce like any other American.  However, it is still possible to encounter challenges in the workforce for various reasons.  Federal Civil Rights law prohibits discrimination in employment based on a factors including age, disability, ethnic origin, gender, race, religion or veteran status. In addition, many states have adopted civil rights laws that provide additional protections against discrimination in hiring or employment, based on additional factors, such as marital status, gender identity, or mental disability. Below we have listed some resources that may help assist you in understanding your rights and protections under the law.

Resources

Insurance

It is critical to educate yourself about your health insurance coverage. The Affordable Care Act has added some consumer protections to your health insurance.  However,  it is important to note the type of policy you have and your levels of coverage.  Learn more about insurance

Emergency Room

Appropriate care in the ER can be challenging for people with bleeding disorders. As a rare and highly specialized condition many health care providers are not experienced in treating a bleeding disorder.  This can be compounded in an emergency situation.  Below are some resources to help you navigate an emergency room situation.

Resources

HFA has developed a “Be Prepared Toolkit:”  Click here or on the image for tools intended to help you take proactive steps to be ready for all sorts of circumstances – natural disaster, planning for the inevitable emergency room visit and prepping for travel.

Be Prepared Toolkit

 

 

 

Assisting and Advocating for the Bleeding Disorders Community